The holiday season can be especially tough for those in Minnesota who have just gotten divorced. While emotions may run high, it is important for parents to understand that the holiday season should be geared toward what their children want to do. This will likely require the parents to put aside their differences and communicate effectively for the sake of their kids. By handling the process outside of court, it may be possible to create a plan that each side is comfortable with.

Avoiding a court order may be important for those who want to exert as much control over their holiday schedule as possible. Once a judge makes an order, it is usually binding on all parties until it is changed or revoked. Avoiding a courtroom also minimizes the chances that the children are used as pawns in a battle between the adults. Ideally, children will be given the same holiday experience that they had when their parents were still together.

If it isn’t possible to continue previous holiday traditions, it is imperative that parents and children develop new ones. Parents should be aware that their children will want to spend time with grandparents and other extended family members. Therefore, they should be included in any holiday schedule that the parents create together.

Those who are going through a divorce may want to consider their children’s needs when doing so. A collaborative divorce may allow individuals to come to a settlement in a timely manner without putting their children in the middle of the dispute. In many cases, a collaborative divorce will easier on the people who are ending their relationship as well. This is because their emotional and mental health are generally taken into consideration during settlement talks.